Promposals bring fun, unique twists to age-old tradition

This year, there have been several promposals, whether it was in class, privately, or publicly during the lunch period.

Promposals are typically between two upperclassmen when one of them is asking the other to accompany them to prom either as a date or just as friends.

Depending on the person, some students want their promposal to be a school wide event, where as some just want it to be personal and private. Senior Shane Ramsey promposed to senior Sonali Ranasoma at her house. “ It wasn’t for attention and it was more personal which I like.” says Ranasoma. Ranasoma and Ramsey are good friends, and do not characterize themselves as a couple. Ranasoma adds, “It just makes our friendship stronger.”

Senior Idrissa Toure’s promposal to senior Kendall Peyton’s was held at school, where many friends and classmates gathered around to watch. Peyton says, “I definitely like the public attention. It makes it more fun and cute.”

Toure brought a sign to ask her to prom with notes, a Starbucks drink, and balloons that spelled out her name. “I knew it was going to happen,” she says referring to the promposal, “there was no way I would have rejected his promposal.”

Instead of asking before school at lunch or at the end of the day, some students bring their promposal to their classroom, asking their teachers permission first. Somer teachers praise promposals, such as English teacher Amy Branson. “I think they are a once in a lifetime thing,” says Mrs. Branson, “and as long as they don’t take up too much class time, I think they are fun and unique.”

A good promposal takes good planning, time, and effort. Toure and Ramsey both started planning their promposals ahead of time. The two made sure they thought out the process clearly and made it special by putting their own twist on it.