Family of entrepreneurs proud of youngest’s contribution to business and charity

Senior Alice Creel’s family has been involved in business for most of her life, so when her 13 year old sister Daisy Creel decided to create her own lip gloss company, she was completely supportive.

At age 10, Daisy wanted to find a way to combine her love for animals and business. Inspired by her rescue animals and her desire to give back, she created Lipzu, a lipgloss company that produces animal shaped products and donates a portion of their profits to The Humane Society. Now, three years later, Lipzu has a fully developed website and factory creating its merchandise.

Though her mother provides support, Daisy acts as the prime decision maker for her company. “I think of myself as Daisy’s assistant,” says Daisy and Alice’s mother, Amy Creel. “She makes the decisions and I help as needed.” Daisy is in charge of Lipzu’s social media presence, developing ideas for new products, and representing the business in interviews and at press events.

The Creel family has previous experience in the world of business. Mrs. Creel started her own company, Teething Bling, while her children were growing up and uses a portion of the proceeds to go to Dress for Success, an organization that helps disadvantaged women find professional clothing. “Me, my mom, and my sister have long advocated for rescue animals, so having our own companies is almost a way of activism,” says Alice.

Daisy and Mrs. Creel agree, Lipzu has given them a unique experience. “Running a business has taught me a lot,” says Daisy, “I have learned that you’re never too young to make a difference.” Her contributions caused Wayne Pacelle, CEO of the United States Humane Society, to contact her directly and thank her for her dedication to the cause.

The Creel family have expressed their support for Daisy and her ambitions. Alice regularly helps vend Lipzu at fairs and events. “We all pitch in. It’s honestly just part of life for the family,” says Alice, “we do it because we love it.”

While she is running her own business at 13, Daisy has hopes of becoming a large animal veterinarian in the future, so she can continue to help animals. She wants everyone to know, they too can make a difference no matter who they are.“I feel like sometimes quiet kids get overlooked, but we have a lot to say if people will stop to listen,” says Daisy.